IN THE NEWS

BELIEVE IN THE SCIENCE’ THE PANDEMIC. COVID-19 VACCINATIONS FINALLY BEGIN LOCALLY.

While Dec. 21 may seem like eons ago because everyone is looking forward and hopeful to what 2021 will bring, it was a big day for the physicians of Monroe Pediatrics… click here to read more.

GOOD TOUCH, BAD TOUCH

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Written By, Dr. Jamee Goldstein
I will never forget the conversation. It was my husband’s birthday and my boys and I were driving home to celebrate. As usual, I was asking questions about their day when I was hit with the reality that I had failed my son. Me, a pediatrician! My oldest, who was just 3 at the time, revealed he was being hit by his daycare teacher and that she had been bribing the children with ice cream and telling them not to tell their parents because we would be “scared.” I was horrified as I realized this had been going on for the 6 months he was enrolled at the daycare, in the bathroom of his classroom where there were no cameras.
I spoke with my son and praised him for telling me. I called CPS. I pulled my children from the preschool and immediately resigned as their medical director.
It took CPS a week to get out to us to interview my son. His story was consistent and detailed. The CPS worker informed me his story was true. I was so disappointed in myself for not having taught him what to do/say and horribly emotionally hurt for my son.
It is this awful experience that prompted me to start teaching the children in our practice about what to do if someone is hurting them. At every physical, starting age 2 ½-3 years old, I ask the children the following questions: “What do you do if someone touches you and you don’t want them to? Who do you tell? What do you do if that person says not to tell mom/dad/grandma/etc. because they’ll be scared or mad?” The responses I get from the children range from not knowing what to say or do to being super proud that they know the answers to my questions. Many parents are surprised to see their children’s reactions. Many parents say they didn’t realize they needed to start those discussions so young. Some parents inform me that their children are never with someone who isn’t family and I remind them even family can be inappropriate. I then share my story.
It’s a tough discussion. How do you prepare your child without frightening them? How do you get them to understand that their body is their own? How do you help them get over the fear of the threat?
I tell children that no one is allowed to touch them ANYWHERE on their bodies, not just in their bathing suit area as we were taught as kids. I tell them that if someone “does something bad to them with their words or their body” they MUST tell mom/dad/guardian. I reassure them that they are NOT to keep the “bad thing” a SECRET and that mom/dad/etc are “SUPERHEROES with their capes under their shirt” and that their job is to stop the bad things from happening. I also tell them I’m only allowed to look at their private parts because I’m their doctor and there is a trusted adult with them.
I encourage parents to discuss good touch/bad touch with their children every so often, but before going into someone else’s care. We talk about stranger danger and screaming “you’re not my mommy/daddy” instead of “fire” or “help” if someone tries to grab you. We chat about safety heroes, kind-of-knows, and don’t-knows. Parents learn to have these discussions with their children before going somewhere crowded. I also recommend parents obtain a copy of “The Safe Side” video to view with their children. It’s a fantastic tool to open conversation and help prepare children. It is a video put together by John Walsh from “America’s Most Wanted” and the woman who started the “Baby Einstein” series. It is goofy and informative, and I encourage watching and discussing it with children multiple times.
This is not an easy discussion to have with children, but it must be done. There is a balance that you need to strike between educating and empowering them and causing them to be fearful of the world. I encourage all of you to reach out to your Allied pediatrician if you need help starting this vital conversation. They would be happy to guide you in protecting your children.

Sex and Social Distancing

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Written By, Dr. Jamee Goldstein
As quarantine continues at various levels throughout the state, maintaining emotional and social distance is difficult for all of us, but particularly for our teenagers. As a natural part of development, teens crave a connection with their peer group and rebel against authority. In addition, teenagers view themselves as invincible and their still-developing brains cannot assess potential consequences.
Enforcing social distancing with our children, adolescents and young adults requires a great commitment by parents who are already burdened by the pandemic. Seeing teenagers gathering in groups, not wearing masks, and not observing the 6-foot rule is concerning.
And now the sensitive part…
In the last few weeks, pediatricians are getting more requests to test for sexually transmitted infections and are seeing more young women with urinary tract infections after having sexual intercourse. These children admit to sneaking around, not wearing masks, and not using protection against sexually transmitted diseases or pregnancy. Parents can make a difference in these behaviors. If you suspect your teen is sexually active, please discuss safe sex practices with them. These would include condom use, forms of birth control, and of course abstinence. We would also ask you to remind them that sexual activity is not observing the 6-foot social distancing rule, so they are not only putting themselves at risk of contracting a disease or getting pregnant, but they are also at risk of contracting COVID19 and spreading it to others.
If you are uncomfortable having this difficult conversation with your adolescent or young adult, please reach out to your pediatrician. We are happy to have that discussion and to educate your child in a non-judgmental manner.

'STAY HOME. STAY HEALTHY. THANK YOU AGAIN FOR THINKING OF US'

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The physicians and staff of Monroe Pediatrics would like to say a huge thank you to the Fire and Police Departments of Monroe, Harriman and Woodbury, the Monroe Volunteer Ambulance, the Orange County Highway Department, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department and the New York State Police for the morale-boosting parade in front of our office on Wednesday, April 22. Click here to read on…

THANK YOU TO OUR POLICE, FIRE, AMBULANCE, AND LOCAL OFFICIALS FOR THE DRIVE-BY LOVE TODAY!

It was such an awesome sight to see! We are so appreciative of your support today and every day!
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STAY HOME, JUST STAY HOME

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Coronavirus restrictions have shut down just about everything, but essential services like physician offices remain open.
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PIE IN THE FACE 2017

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Looking to build on last year’s whipped cream success, Monroe Pediatrics will host its third annual “Pie in the Face and Tricky Tray for Pediatric Cancer” on Saturday, Sept. 10 at 2 p.m. at its Gilbert St. offices. …Read More

LEARN WHAT TO EXPECT IN MIDDLE SCHOOL

Registration is now taking place for a special, free program for girls entering the sixth-grade at Monroe-Woodbury Middle School.
“A Girl’s Guide to Middle School” will feature three workshops designed to help incoming sixth-grade girls become more knowledgeable about three topics which “girls who’ve been there” say aren’t always discussed as part of middle school orientation.
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DR. GOLDSTEIN’S ACOP COMMUNITY PEDIATRICIAN OF THE YEAR FOR 2016.

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Congratulations! You have been chosen to receive the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP) 2016 Harold H. Finkel, DO and Arnold Melnick, DO Community Pediatrician of the Year Award.

The Harold H. Finkel, DO award was established in memory of Dr. Finkel whose illustrious career spanned over 50 years of community pediatric practice. He was known for his exceptional care and availability to his patients, his commitment to students, interns, residents, addressing community child health needs, advocating for the most vulnerable children and service to the ACOP.
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